The Importance of Thematic Concepts and Statements in Fiction Writing

Theme, along with plot, character, setting and style, is one of the main components of fiction writing. It is the central topic of the work and can be divided into two categories. Thematic concepts are what the readers believe the work is about. Thematic statement is what the work says about the subject.

Daryl HarrisonThemes can often be summed up into a single word like love, betrayal, death, lust. These themes can include tales of nostalgia, ambition, conflicts with growing technology, coming of age tales and issues with individuals within society.

A book may even have several themes. They often explore ethical questions and have cross-cultural ideas. The author will not usually ask these big questions explicitly but pepper remnants of them throughout the story, often having the characters wrestle with the dilemma.

Themes can help you learn more about yourself and how you view the world. Authors will, at times, leave the final takeaway up to the reader, like ending a book just before the main character chooses between love and money. Readers are able to put themselves in the character’s shoes and decide, offering insight into what they value.

Daryl Harrison is the author of The Waiting Game. His book shows the internal struggles of a wrongly accused detective, searching for the truth before it’s too late. Daryl touches on the themes of issues with mental illness, a battle that Daryl has personally fought. Daryl now lives in New York where he is pursuing his writing career.

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Don’t Use That Tone With Me!

Tone is a literary compound which illustrates the attitudes toward the subject and audience. It may be formal, serious, informal, ironic, intimate, condescending, solemn, somber, playful, etc. How a work’s theme is approached determines the tone.

Daryl HarrisonAlthough tone and mood are often confused they are different. The mood is the atmosphere or feeling shaped by the story. Mood is most often conveyed through setting, voice, and theme. The tone of a work is one of the elements that help set the mood.

Diction or word choice and syntax or sentence structure are two of the most common ways authors set the tone of a story. Using short, broken sentences conveys a very different tone than using long, complex, sometimes run-on sentences. In the same manner the words that an author uses paint a picture of the emotion behind a character’s feelings or actions or the scene setting. A long description of dark and hallow stare of a looming man across the room is very different than the author telling about the friendly and warm gaze of the guy across the room.

The tone, especially when the author describes a character, can help the audience rally with or against that character.

Daryl Harrison is one of many authors who like to use various tones to illicit emotion from his readers. In Daryl’s critically acclaimed novel The Waiting Game, the tone changes throughout the book to pull his readers into the world he paints. Daryl Harrison used to be a teacher before trying his hand at writing. He lives in New York with his family.

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What A Character!

Writing good fiction depends on the writer’s ability to craft a story that readers want to invest their time and energy reading. One of the aspects of a novel that help draws reader in are the characters. Books are filled with many different types of individuals and they all play an important role.

Daryl HarrisonFirst off, it’s important to understand what a character is. A character is a participant in the story, usually a person, but can be any identity, entity or persona. There are several different types.

First, and maybe the most commonly known, is the protagonist. This person is the main character of the story. You should try to make your readers identify with this person and care about what happens to them. The protagonist is often referred to as the “good guy,” however there can also be an antihero as the main character.

You can’t have a protagonist without an antagonist. This is the character who opposes the main character. Although typically thought of as the “bad guy” there can be elements of good in an antagonist too. In many stories the protagonist and antagonist have to face off in some type of fight or battle, with the protagonist typically winning.

There is also the point-of-view character. This is the person through whom the story is viewed. Although they are often the main character, they do not have to be.

Daryl Harrison is a fiction writer who lives in New York with his wife, Abby Raines. Daryl is a successful self-published author.

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Fiction Writing Tips – It’s All About The Characters

One of the things that draws readers into a book and elicits the emotion writers crave is a strong cast of characters. Developing memorable, well-rounded characters will help readers love your novel. But where do you start?

First, come up with a name and description. You want it to fit the person. Make the reader believe the name was made for this character and help them picture the person in their minds. Give good details about what the character looks like including their hair, skin, voice, identifying markings, style and personality. This will help the reader see your characters as real, and connect with them.

Daryl Harrison

Daryl Harrison

Next think about the character’s storyline. What will happen to them, especially in the end of the book? It is important to have an idea so you can keep the plot on track.

What is the person’s motivation and drive? Think about their internal and external wants and needs.

Next you need to narrow down any conflict the character will be involved with. Is it internal, external or both? Physical, mental or emotional?

And lastly, what does the character learn at the end of the book, if they make it that far? Do they accomplish their goal? Find love? Get revenge? Knowing their fate will help you craft the story around the main person.
Make sure to do this for all the major players in your novel so you know who they are, what they look like, what they want, and where they are going.

Daryl Harrison knows a thing or two about how to craft an interesting character. He self-published his critically acclaimed novel The Waiting Game, which features complex characters and a thrilling plot.

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How to Build Climax in Fiction Writing

We have all been there before, completely engrossed into a story, watching as each character and plotline merge, coming to a head and an inevitable conflict that you have been anticipating for so long. This is called the Climax, and is the most exciting and meaningful part of the story, where everything, all the issues and plot points merge for a final finale that dictates the final victor of an opposing conflict. Though this victory does not have to be absolute, there does have to be some kind of conflict that takes place and a victory, even if it is just a small one. Much like the movie ‘Star Wars,’ a popular Sci-fi that started off as a fiction book written by George Lucas. In the famous climax of the movie, Luke Skywalker blows up the evil empire’s Death Star, a space station capable of destroying an entire planet. Though there is a temporary victory for the rebel forces, the reality is that the empire is vast and powerful, with thousands of planets and governments backing their actions. So in reality, a good climax may be the end of one plot, but only the beginning of another, as the evil empire is certain to seek revenge for Luke blowing up their expensive star station.

Daryl HarrisonBuilding up to a good climax is about progressing the action, bringing it up one step at a time that keeps the reader on the edge of their seat. The most important aspect of a good climax is assuring that all building pressures that you have been mounting are purged. You don’t want to leave anything unexplained or incomplete. The only exception to that rule is when you want to leave a cliffhanger. Even in this case you want the pressure purged, but perhaps left not fully explained, like an enemy escapes a fight, disappearing into the night.

For More Detail Visit Here: Daryl Harrison

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How to Build Climax in Fiction Writing

We have all been there before, completely engrossed into a story, watching as each character and plotline merge, coming to a head and an inevitable conflict that you have been anticipating for so long. This is called the Climax, and is the most exciting and meaningful part of the story, where everything, all the issues and plot points merge for a final finale that dictates the final victor of an opposing conflict. Though this victory does not have to be absolute, there does have to be some kind of conflict that takes place and a victory, even if it is just a small one. Much like the movie ‘Star Wars,’ a popular Sci-fi that started off as a fiction book written by George Lucas. In the famous climax of the movie, Luke Skywalker blows up the evil empire’s Death Star, a space station capable of destroying an entire planet. Though there is a temporary victory for the rebel forces, the reality is that the empire is vast and powerful, with thousands of planets and governments backing their actions. So in reality, a good climax may be the end of one plot, but only the beginning of another, as the evil empire is certain to seek revenge for Luke blowing up their expensive star station.

Daryl Harrison

Daryl Harrison

Building up to a good climax is about progressing the action, bringing it up one step at a time that keeps the reader on the edge of their seat. The most important aspect of a good climax is assuring that all building pressures that you have been mounting are purged. You don’t want to leave anything unexplained or incomplete. The only exception to that rule is when you want to leave a cliffhanger. Even in this case you want the pressure purged, but perhaps left not fully explained, like an enemy escapes a fight, disappearing into the night.

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Importance of the Re-Write

When writing fiction novels, many rookie and first time writers often make the mistake of believing that the first words that come tumbling out of their heads are the best ones. The reality of that is that often when you are focusing more on the creative aspect, the actual technical writing part can suffer. This isn’t the end of the world however, it just means that you have crafted the bones of your work, and now you need to work on the flesh. That is basically what a re-write is, simply retranslating your story and making sure that all of the ideas brewing in your head made it down on to paper in a way that is easy to follow and understand, as well as be engaging. Don’t think of the re-write as changing or adapting your story because it is not good enough, think of it as refining it and polishing the edges to make it more accommodating. Think of your manuscript as an unrefined and unprocessed good like wheat for instance. Wheat itself isn’t very useful, but when you grind it up in a mill you get flour, which can create delicious and nutritious bread. The same is true for your book, you just need some refinement.

Daryl Harrison

Daryl Harrison

Once you have finished the creative phase of writing, entering the re-write stage is a kind of editing process where you make sure that there is not any plot holes or lack of motivation, contradictory ideologies or physical world principles. Think about it as editing the grammar of your creativity, making sure it is all logical.

Daryl Harrison is a self-published author who learned the value of re-writing his work before releasing it.

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